How Army Cooks Are Trained To Feed 800 Soldiers In The Field | Boot Camp | Business Insider

  • Опубликовано: 6 дней назад

    Business InsiderBusiness Insider
    подписчиков: 7 млн

    We got an inside look at how Army Culinary Specialists are trained at the Joint Culinary Center of Excellence at Fort Lee, Virginia. Three to four thousand members of the Army and National Guard graduate every year from the eight-week course, which trains soldiers how to prepare a wide array of food in a variety of settings. After instruction in the techniques of cooking and baking, trainees prepare three meals a day for their fellow soldiers in an actual garrison kitchen. Training culminates outdoors, where trainees cook for hundreds of soldiers in the same mobile kitchens they could be cooking in if deployed. Insider spent five days at the Joint Culinary Center of Excellence, where we observed different classes at various stages of training.
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    How Army Cooks Are Trained To Feed 800 Soldiers In The Field | Boot Camp | Business Insider

woldewhosonolden +3
woldewhosonolden

My grandfather worked in a butcher shop when he was young and became a cook in the army during WWII. Although he was deployed with front line troops, he credits the position for keeping him alive. His war stories to us always revolved around ways they got creative with finding and preparing sustenance.

12 часов назад
Zachary Hoffman +801
Zachary Hoffman

My Dad was an Army cook, so always a soft spot in my heart for the cooks. From my years in the military, the two groups of soldiers that consistently were the hardest working were cooks and mechanics. Often overlooked and underappreciated, cooks and mechanics keep the army functioning. When you have bad maintenance and bad food, you get the Russian army in Ukraine.

22 часа назад
Edward Zabala +864
Edward Zabala

From a former Marine Infantryman, thank you cooks! You were the hardest working guys I've ever seen. Up at 4 in bed at 11. I learned that in mess duty. And, thank you for making my life better in garrison and the field!

9 часов назад
nwmancuso +72
nwmancuso

My great uncle was a US army cook during WWII and was stationed at a POW camp in the states (German POWs). He had a Germanic background so he made authentic German food for the POWs. At the end of the war, one of the prisoners gave him a lighter made from a part off a Stuka dive bomber as a sign of gratitude for his cooking.

2 часа назад
Imperial Soldier +397
Imperial Soldier

I was a 92G and the job is BRUTAL. This job requires 100 percent dedication. I wouldn't recommend it if you have a family or in a relationship or you value your free time.

9 часов назад
Just Say No +83
Just Say No

This is the kind of stuff that differentiates a professional army from one that's not: logistics. I do agree that food is fuel, not just for the energy but to put a smile for a while on somebody who had a terrible day. Food is love, and this video gave me the munchies :D

2 часа назад
Pami Rose +2
Pami Rose

I was a First Sergeant and without a doubt among the hardest working soldiers of my unit were the cooks. Their work starts very early to prep for breakfast and ends very late with cleaning up after dinner. I have so much respect to all these soldiers.

12 часов назад
Carly +160
Carly

Much respect to all cooks, you’re overworked, under appreciated, and the backbone of everything.

9 часов назад
Luke +65
Luke

Former 92G (Food Service Specialist) & damn was it good to watch this. Really brings back so many memories. I remember my unit never had the CKs and I was always envious of the ones who had the CKs 😅

4 часа назад
Alex Ace +19
Alex Ace

Did this during two weeks of military excercise camp. I was the only extra guy with a hygiene qualifications so they put me in the food tent. Despite the dish water being almost frozen when we had dish duty and the amount of sleep, something about stirring a 500 litre pot of pea soup was fascinating and enjoyable. Got to eat first and take all the left over desserts.

2 часа назад
aterseraph +325
aterseraph

I didn't serve in the Army, but I served in the USAF and worked on the flight line on the F-16; and I can tell you that one of the things we REALLY appreciated during a 12 hr shift on the freezing cold flight line was a hot meal cooked for you. This field is one of the most important in any branch of service. Period. When the operators come back after running and gunning, and everyone else from doing their jobs they need to eat. Thank you to all of the cooks or "food specialists" from every branch of service. THANK YOU.

9 часов назад
Gabi Reinoehl +78
Gabi Reinoehl

I honestly didn’t even think about who was feeding the military and this video HAS to be one of the most interesting videos I’ve ever seen. This is incredible and I have so much for every little or big role involved with helping the military function and this made me appreciate the cooks so much. ❤️

4 часа назад
Luis Lopez +3
Luis Lopez

I am a culinary specialist for 4 years and this video went through the majority of what our AIT looked like. What isn't said in the video is the sleep schedule and the reality of cooking in the field. Most cooks only get at most 4 hours of sleep regardless of the conditions. When cooking in the field you will learn to take showers and wash your clothes with a 5 gallon bucket of soapy water. The recipe cards will most likely not be utilized when cooking for over 500 soldiers. Whatever ingredients you got, you will use all of it. PMCS are extremely important regaurdless of the mission. Especially when the nearest maintenance shop is over 200 miles. Make sure all you equipment works properly before using it and note any faults during use. Last thing you need is half your mbus to backfire and set off all the carbon monoxide detectors or your CK tires blow up during convoy. The field sanitation center is the bane of all cooks. You will hate setting it up and it will never be perfect. That's probably the most dangerous equipment we got. If that tent looks like it's tilting or the winds are pushing it too much or the soil is too soft then its best to not bother setung it up. Not worth it to get crushed while washing dishes. There's more to say about being a cook but those are the things that come up to my mind. There's many good reasons why the retention rate for cooks are one of the lowest in the army.

12 часов назад
CountChocula +24
CountChocula

I was in the Army from 2006-2013. I loved and appreciated every cook I met. The army runs because of those men and women. They work long hours to ensure this.

2 часа назад
Phillip Fithing +89
Phillip Fithing

I was a cook in the Army. It was a love hate relationship. Hated the hours, loved seeing the troops' morale get boosted with hot chow. It was also a challenge to fit in Daily Soldier's training ( i.e. airborne ops) and not thinning out the DFACs manpower. Definitely learned time management and instilled within me a really strong worth ethic

7 часов назад
Ty +13
Ty

This video definitely goes in depth. I was a 92 Get down in Korea and then I was stationed at Ft Campbell. The sleeping and the consistent work schedule are killers. If your not a Sgt you'll be doing grunt work until you make the rank to tell others. We were overworked and sometimes we prayed to get the holidays off like the rest of the base but no. You'll work every holiday if you try and go to sick call you'll be called a "Blue Falcon" basically someone who does everything to get out of work. Even if it's a legitimate issue. Toxic leadership as well but that's all of the military. If you go into this field I just hope u enjoy cooking and go into it with a good mindset because you'll need it.

2 часа назад
Sam Chunghoon +42
Sam Chunghoon

I actually was a part of this training back in the early 70ʻs. It was somewhat helpful in later years as I continued my culinary career after leaving the army. It was pretty intense at times.

9 часов назад
SpockvsMcCoy Kirk +8
SpockvsMcCoy Kirk

I was in the U.S.Air Force in the 1980s. There are a couple of things that I still remember about the chow halls. The first was when I was stationed at a U.S. Army base for my career training after boot camp. That base served meals to Army personnel in field training...but Air Force personnel like me ate the same meals. I remember their chipped beef stew over rice...an entire plate of it so huge that I struggled to finish it as a 145 lbs 18-year-old. Then when I was finally stationed at an AFB, my favorite meal was an omelette for breakfast...but I disliked their halibut, LOL.

4 часа назад
jthavorn +1
jthavorn

Army cooks get made fun sometimes, but as someone who knew a few army cooks during my time on active duty, I can tell you that these people work hard, often very long hours. The morale aspect couldn’t be more true as after spending a week out in the field, coming back to a hot meal being handed to you by a fellow solider made me say to myself “this isn’t so bad…” 🤟

12 часов назад
Skoville +48
Skoville

I had many battle buddies who where cooks in Germany Iraq and Ft. Drum NY. They never had good sleep they where always stressed and tired. Because of that they had perks of not doing PT with the unit. They did pt on their own time or platoon schedule. They also hated ftx exercises because they worked a lot and had to train also. Lots of chefs reclass because of the schedule always changing 💯

9 часов назад

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